Late Night Cravings Keeping You & Your Gym Partner From Reaching Your Goals?

Scravingso you workout hard in the gym with your training partner, but some evenings do you wish that person was there telling you to put down the crackers and cheese? Are you struggling to fight those cravings each night for high sugar or fatty foods? Did you know that what you eat at night and how close you eat before bed will have a huge impact on fat loss? Well there may be a really easy way for you to kick the cravings…

Studies suggest that breakfast may carry within it the very answer to controlling these cravings. There is a reason it is called the most important meal of the day even though it’s been found that up to 60 percent of American young people consistently skip it. Well, assistant professor Heather Leidy from the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, says eating a breakfast rich in protein significantly improves appetite control and reduces unhealthy snacking on high-fat or high-sugar foods in the evening, according to Science Daily.

Most people are used to relying on a breakfast of high sugar cereals, pastries or carbohydrates that leave our system quite quickly causing us to get hungry well before lunch. A study from 2013 shows that consuming a high-protein breakfast led to increased fullness and reduced evening snacking on high-fat and high-sugar foods. This in turn seems to affect brain activity in a way that cravings later in the day are more controlled and thus less likely.

So what would make a good high protein breakfast? Well study participants ate egg and beef-based foods such as breakfast burritos, egg-based waffles and beef sausage patties. Leidy also suggests eating plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese or ground pork loin as alternatives.

The best way to find out if it works is to give it a try with your gym buddy today! Try to combine this tactic with ensuring you have a good portion of carbohydrates with lunch and we can almost guarantee you will see your diet improve.

For more about the study, here is a link to the article:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130326151127.htm

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